A minute with...

SHPA members are progressive advocates for clinical excellence, passionate about patient care and committed to evidence-based practice.

Here, we spend a minute with some of them, to learn about their lives across Australia and how their work in a variety of healthcare settings improves patient outcomes.

A minute with...Kylee Hayward

31 May 2017

A minute with Jeanie Misko

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kylee Hayward has lived and breathed hospital pharmacy from both sides of the fence, on the ground in healthcare facilities in New Zealand, the United Kingdom and Australia and, since 2013, as Lead Education Pharmacist at SHPA’s Federal Secretariat.

Kylee says the shifts in direction over her career can be traced back to a love of variety.

‘I always wanted to be a hospital pharmacist – my uncle was an anaesthetist, so from an early age I understood the challenges of hospital work.

‘This was certainly realised during my internship at a very progressive hospital in South Auckland, which served a population base with a high prevalence of complex and chronic diseases.’

After a stint in the UK (I was all over the place), in which she met her future husband at a Christmas party (among other things), Kylee settled in Australia and moved into clinical education before joining SHPA.

‘The step up from local level to a national view of healthcare is fascinating, and I feel lucky to be able to partner with members in every state and territory to help ensure every patient, Australia-wide, experiences the same excellent medicines management.

‘Ultimately my work is about the next generation and it’s a joy helping people develop as practitioners and spending time with people committed to helping other people grow.’

Above all, Kylee says interacting with SHPA members as they redefine pharmacy’s role in healthcare is the strongest source of inspiration and enjoyment in her work.

‘I love meeting members, getting to know them and what they’re doing – and not just the whizz bang stuff.

‘SHPA members are truly leading practice to influence change, and this doesn’t just build to a crescendo around conferences or publications, it happens day in and day out across the country.’

And as for her ideal Sunday, away from clinCATs, summits and CPD?

‘I’m sleeping in… and not taking my children to 7,000 activities!’

A minute with...Jeanie Misko

Jeanie Misko

Jeanie Misko thought she’d made her mind up to skip hospital pharmacy in her student days.

‘I told the Chief Pharmacist on my fourth year rotation that I hated hospital pharmacy and that I’d never be interested.

‘They told me “come back when you change your mind” and, after two years in community pharmacy, I missed the clinical challenges of the hospital setting… so they were right… I did come back’.

Jeanie says having clear goals and making the most of opportunities throughout her career have begun to pay dividends.

‘I always wanted to work at Fiona Stanley Hospital so I was really excited when an opportunity arose. At the moment I’m enjoying my involvement with smart infusion pumps that reduce dosage errors through a “Guardrails” program.

‘In the future I’d like to specialise further and open up broader medicines information services to the wider community, and look at improving smart infusion pump technology across the state.’

Beyond her busy days poring over medicines information and the latest pharmacy research, Jeanie says you can find her in literature of a different kind.

‘I run a book review blog – samstillreading.wordpress.com – so on a day off I’ll often be reading, writing, or both, preferably in a park on one of Perth’s many, many sunny days.

‘It keeps me busy and also in touch with the local book scene – I’m @samstillreading on Twitter and Instagram if you’re interested!’

Although she’s now happily furthering her career as Senior Pharmacist for Medicines Information, Jeanie says it was a brief exchange with West Australian footy royalty that sparked her pharmacy journey.

‘I’m a huge West Coast Eagles supporter and when I was 15 I met John Worsfold, who is a pharmacist, and basically made the decision to emulate him then and there.

‘I even told him on the spot so we both went bright red, hopefully he doesn’t remember!’

A minute with...David Morton

David Morton

An hour is all it took for David Morton to commit to entering the world of hospital pharmacy.

‘It’s still very vivid for me, in my third-year placement at the Austin Hospital I was thrown in the mix with some really highly motivated pharmacists running the student program and it just felt right.

‘I’d assumed I would end up in community pharmacy but the pace and the challenges of the hospital environment actually looked…fun.’

Following that moment, other turning points for David, who is currently the Director of Pharmacy at St John of God Bendigo Hospital, have been equally as spontaneous.

‘Five years ago I was a junior pharmacist in a team of 60 exceptional pharmacists.  I wouldn’t have believed I’d be a hospital pharmacy manager today,’ he says.

‘My motto was, and still is, don’t predict too far in the future, enjoy what you’re doing at the time and if you do a good job opportunities will open up for you.’

Originally from Wangaratta, Victoria, David began his career at the Austin, then spent some time in Brisbane before his current role in Bendigo, a major centre in Victoria’s Goldfields region.  He has thoroughly enjoyed all different settings.

‘What interests and drives me is in a city the size of Bendigo you can have a big impact on public health through influencing how pharmacy is managed, and this influence can have a wide-reaching impact on the community.’

‘For instance, we’ve completely changed our pharmacy provider model, setting a higher standard of clinical pharmacy services.  This means country patients from central Victoria all the way up to the Murray, who access our service, can expect the same level of pharmaceutical care as metropolitan patients. 

At the end of the day, David says his main motivation is found at home.

‘I’m a pretty new dad and my three-year-old and one-year-old keep me very busy.

‘My ideal Sunday usually involves a beer and the TV but these day’s it’s less likely to be the footy, and more likely to be ABC for Kids.’
 

A minute with...Emma Bartlett

Emma Bartlett

For Emma Bartlett, variety is the crucial ingredient in her pharmacy career.

‘Integrating research and managing different roles in my everyday work really appeals to me,’ she says.

‘Hospital pharmacy – particularly in regional and remote area – is the perfect environment for staying on top of the latest developments in medicines management.’

In her fourth year of university, Emma was placed in Port Augusta, at the head of South Australia’s Spencer Gulf, which she says opened many doors for broadening her expertise and experience.

‘As a regional city servicing a huge area of remote communities, being in P.A. has allowed me to work with the Royal Flying Doctor Service on outreach to Outback towns.

‘This involves monthly trips to supply medications, educate local nursing staff, engage with fly in / fly out clinicians to review inpatients and discuss new therapeutic guidelines.’

Emma remains in Port Augusta today and has begun pharmacy research aimed at improving health outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples.

‘One opportunity I truly enjoyed was working closely with Pika Wiya Health Service to collect information for my internship project “Learning From Aboriginal Experiences Of Infection Management In a Regional Hospital.”

‘An area of focus for the service is improving the supply of and compliance with medicines and, in my intern year, I conducted a project looking at patients that self-discharge to follow and understand what factors affect their medicines use at home.’

When she’s not working Emma, who was born and raised in Keith in South Australia’s south east, is usually in the great outdoors, making the most of desert state’s dramatic landscape.

‘All around Port Augusta there is spectacular scenery – my pick of the bunch is Devil’s Peak near Quorn, where a reasonably difficult hike is rewarded with incredible views.’

A minute with...Ashleigh Boatman

Ashleigh Boatman

Ashleigh Boatman says it was seeing her education come alive that attracted her to hospital pharmacy.

‘At uni I loved learning all about bloods and disease processes and, in the hospital pharmacy setting, I could put this knowledge into practice much more easily.’

Hailing from Ararat in Victoria, today Ashleigh is the only oncology pharmacist on the wards at Dubbo Base Hospital, an environment that sees her closely integrated into multi-disciplinary teams at an exciting time for the region.

‘People travel to us from as far as Bourke and Cobar Lightning Ridge near the Queensland border, sometimes driving over four hours each way for one appointment, so we have great determination to improve access in the region, starting with a pilot RVAC (remote video assisted chemotherapy) clinic in Coonabarabran in April.

‘Serving such a large catchment area, we’re working to expand staff and clinical capacity with a 5-10 year goal that all patients can still receive pharmacy services outside Dubbo.’

After prepping for patient discharges and managing complex complementary cancer treatments, Ashleigh says she enjoys the lifestyle on the Western Plains.

‘Dubbo is a perfect fit – it’s large enough that it has everything I need, but small enough so there’s no congestion… I can always get a park!

‘It’s also incredibly easygoing. Lots of people are in the same situation as me, so it is very easy to meet people and make friends.’

Outside the working world, Ashleigh describes her ideal afternoon as in a sunny park reading a book under a tree, ‘although maybe not right now, because all I’m reading at the moment are my pharmacy journals!’
 

 

This content is private you must Subscribe or Become a Full Member to keep on reading

Subscribe for Free

Getting your web user account is fast, free and lets you get a taste of the great content and resources available to our members.

  • Access more articles and resources
  • Subscribe to special interest groups to get content tailored to you
  • Buy event tickets online
Join now Learn more